Choosing An Ergonomic Chair | Posturite
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Free set-up on all chairs & desks By one of our ergonomic consultants

Choosing an ergonomic chair


Movement and adjustment is the key

Your body is not a stationary vehicle - it is designed to move. So much so that your body has a built-in warning system that encourages you to move and change position. Pain and discomfort are early warnings from your body to change your current postural habits to ones that reduce the pain and discomfort. Ignore the warnings and the consequences can be severe and long lasting.

The good news is that you can change your habits and re-educate your body. The ergonomic chairs we have selected will help and encourage you to achieve this posture more naturally, making it easy to sustain supported correct posture and active movement.

Movement is the key

Types of ergonomic chair

The seating requirements for work vary from task to task and user to user. The choice of chair should be made on the basis of the working position that predominates during your working day.

  • Ergonomic Office Chairs – For people who spend most of their time on the computer, telephone, in meetings, or reading at the desk.
  • Executive Chairs – For those that want the benefits of an ergonomic office chair, with added style and polish.
  • Industrial Draughtsman Chairs – Designed for higher worktops such as factories and laboratories.
  • Heavy Duty Chairs – For use in a variety of specialist contexts. 24 hour Operator Chairs for surveillance and larger chairs for the larger user.
  • Conference Chairs – Improved ergonomics in a variety of contexts such as meetings, libraries, and class rooms.
  • Kneeling Chairs – Use as an alternative to an ergonomic office chair or for use at home.
  • Stand Up Chairs – Offers a seated posture particularly suited to people who spend most of their working day leaning forward. For example, data inputers, microscope users, light / sound desk or bench workers.